Latest:

Microsoft’s Kudo Tsunoda talks the future of Xbox

MATTHEW DUNN

ADVANCEMENTS in technology have already allowed for impressive changes to the way consumers play video games, but it appears the best is yet to come.

At the forefront of Microsoft’s development is corporate vice-president Kudo Tsunoda and he couldn’t be more thrilled with what the future has in store.

After working as the creative director for motion sensing input device Kinect, he was given the opportunity to lead the vision and experience development of Microsoft Studios portfolio.

As part of his new position, Mr Tsunoda has been driving the creative direction of the Microsoft HoloLens and he hopes to bring a fresh, innovative and gamer-centric approach to the expanding and diverse game portfolio across Xbox and Windows 10 devices.

Mr Tsunoda said even though he had been working hands on with the HoloLens, a wearable holographic computer, he still found the innovative technology to be surreal from time to time.

“I have always been a fan of science fiction growing up and I always thought holograms were so far in the future that we wouldn’t see them for decades,” he told news.com.au.

“But, having something you that you can experience today is just super amazing; it is almost like having a time machine.”

Mr Tsunoda said the crowd reaction during the display of the technology at Microsoft’s keynote address at the E3 video game conference in Los Angeles helped solidify the belief the company had created something very special.

The virtual reality HoloLens world impressed everyone.

The virtual reality HoloLens world impressed everyone. Source: AP

“There are very few times at these types of E3 keynotes where you get a collective audible gasp out of thousands of people,” he told news.com.au.

“This enthusiasm is why we have been partnering with people and working with developers to explore the medium to make sure we are delivering content core gamers will love.”

In addition to holographic technology, Microsoft has been working hard in developing virtual reality (VR) technology for gamers.

“None of the VR technology out there shares a common touch point, so that’s the reason why we have been working with creating content on our Windows 10 platform and not just Xbox,” he said.

Offering a Windows 10 update for Xbox One later this year will not only help with the developments of VR, but also allows the company to create a cross-device syndicated gaming experience never seen before.

Mr Tsunoda said the developments mean gamers will now be able to challenge one another on a game title, regardless of if they own it on PC or Xbox.

“For too long, PC gamers and console gamers were isolated and it was such a shame because we are all just people who love games,” he said.

“This is what makes how we are doing things with Windows 10 so amazing.”

Mr Tsunoda said in addition to developing new technology, the team was working hard to provide gamers with a platform that is good value for money.

This was the driving force behind making the Xbox One backwards compatible.

“What I think is so amazing about gaming at Xbox is players have access to all the games from the Xbox Box 360 coming to Xbox One,” he said.

“This means Xbox One will have the biggest gaming catalogue of any device and will still work to create the new blockbusters gamers love.”

Matthew Dunn flew to Los Angeles as a guest of Microsoft.